Living in an age of ubiquitous connectivity.

Marty Cooper, the inventor of the mobile phone, has observed that we are living in an age of ubiquitous access to people. We are living in an age of connectivity. Connectivity ‘per se’ is of course nothing new. For centuries people have been drawn to spaces where connections can be made: the forum, the market place, the coffee shop. And it is no accident that this is often where ideas originate and from where they spread. However, the power of digital connectivity makes social interaction all pervasive. Any time, any place, any where and any one. Access to connectivity is not hierarchical in the traditional sense but is linked to access to technology. This connectivity will only be enhanced as more sophisticated and clever technology is created as part of the technology arms race.

What does this mean for schools? At the moment, connectivity is about process – installing wireless infrastructures, offering access to PCs or devices and issuing robust policies on digital use all about denying connectivity. All of which is a bolt-on to the core business of the school – learning. Adding fringe benefits but essentially not embracing the potential for a truly connected experience for learners.

Our school is on its own journey. Our fundamental values have not changed. We want to educate young people who enjoy a love of learning for its own sake, are intellectually engaged and who will make a positive difference in the world. Nothing new in this. But our ambition is to set these values in a connected setting. For the last few years we have been exploring what this can mean for the class room. All our students have digital technology in their toolkit either in the class room setting ( 3-11 year olds) or as 1:1 iPad deployment (11-18 year olds). The device is the platform for connection. Its extraordinary power rests in its capacity to connect in a myriad of ways. Our learners have in their hands access to the digital resources created by our teachers whether iTunes U or iBooks; they can connect of course with the Internet which opens a multiplicity of opportunities for learning; they can learn about the power and the darker side of connectivity in a school setting with guidance and support. As we now investigate the possibilities offered by Google Apps for Education, it is becoming clear to me that the learning space can be completely transformed. Seamless interaction between teachers and learners facilitated by a device. A Google Classroom. Essentially digital devices are tearing down physical barriers to learning.

Yet the education of our students, their knowledge and understanding of a wide range of subjects, is essential to their ability to think critically and creatively. The concept of a “Renaissance Man” (or woman) has never been so important. Here the teacher is absolutely vital. Inspiring teaching in the classroom can engage our students in such a way as to enhance their curiosity. Carefully curated connectivity provides pathways for them to explore this curiosity – pathways which are not trammelled by textbooks, work sheets, class rooms or location. Because after all, they enjoy the opportunities to learn in a connected world, in a school with a digital platform, allowing their learning to escape the box of school. What can be more powerful?

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s